Laker "tippiness"

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lilmoe
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Laker "tippiness"

Post by lilmoe » Wed Jul 11, 2012 8:53 pm

I've read several on here that think a Laker is "tippy". I built the free laker about 3 years ago and would have agreed the first year-- the second was much better, even built a seat raised about an inch from the platform running level across the chines. Got along fine until a big powerboat wake really rocked my world, and been gunshy since. Would a couple of Keelsons under the cockpit area help? I'm thinking a triangle piece(1-1/2") about 4 foot long on each side of the bottom. This idea has been brewing awhile, sort of inspired by the "trihedral hull" concept on some of the tupperware craft. Would it help the side-to-side tippy, or hurt the paddling and/or glide? Opinions are requested, advice encouraged, and answers solicited. Thanks

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rodot
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Re: Laker "tippiness"

Post by rodot » Wed Jul 11, 2012 9:41 pm

I have never paddled a laker so I wouldn't know if it was "tippy'. I feel quite stable in my Okwata however and it is a tad narrower then the laker. My seat in that boat is aboul 3 inches off the floor.
I tend to think that any kayak/canoe hit 3/4 on from the rear by a large powerboat wake is in danger of broaching and dispensing the occupants in the briny. This is where I have found the rudder in my Northwind helpful. Your idea of keelsons on the boat sounds interesting. After all surfboards have several fins to aid in a similar situation.
It amazes me just how stupid some of these powerboat skippers are. Especially those with the big cabin cruisers at half throttle. Bow up, arse down with a bow wake of tsunami proportions.

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tx river rat
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Re: Laker "tippiness"

Post by tx river rat » Thu Jul 12, 2012 12:02 am

Length also effects stability, there is no comparison between my 15 +ft lake and my 13 fter. You would definitely hurt your glide and how sweet she paddles
Ron

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jem
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Re: Laker "tippiness"

Post by jem » Thu Jul 12, 2012 6:25 am

It will increase drag a little. If you were to do it, do it aft of your seat area and extend back toward the stern so not to impact paddling.

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David Kopera
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Re: Laker "tippiness"

Post by David Kopera » Thu Jul 12, 2012 3:42 pm

I have a Laker I built 3 years ago, and it was very tippy the first time I took it out. I had a 1 1/2 inch high platform and a 2 inch boat cushion under my bum. I used the boat cushion a backrest when I got back in for the second go round and that helped quite a bit. After I took out the platform and bought a Butt Buddy seat, which is only about 1/2 in thick it stabilized real nice. At 5'4" I have a LOW center of gravity and the overhang doesn't help. I have learned to watch for those pesky powerboaters and will normally try to turn into their wake to minimize problems. There has been a time or two they were lucky I don't pack heat in my kayak, and airboaters, well they like to try and blow you over.

Try lowering your seat as much as comfortable and try that. Happy Yakk'n!!

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Oldsparkey
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Re: Laker "tippiness"

Post by Oldsparkey » Thu Jul 12, 2012 8:01 pm

I find it is like riding a bicycle , the more you do it the steadier everything becomes.
Some of the boats that travel the salt water can toss really big wakes or waves. I like to parallel them and just rock and roll over them as the go under the boat. It gets interesting when they hit the shore ( bank ) and then bounce back , especially if there are more still coming from the initial batch and they meet.
One such area is the tourist ( sightseeing ) boats out of Everglades City in the main canal , they rocked the Freedom kayak I was paddling , quite well , it was a roller coaster ride.

I'm still wishing for an open hunting season on Jet Skis , if they ever have one you can bet I will bag my limit.
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lilmoe
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Re: Laker "tippiness"

Post by lilmoe » Sun Aug 05, 2012 5:04 pm

Thanks much for all the comments and ideas. I must admit that in my normal manner, I went and did what I was originally thinking. (My father-in-law often called me "stubborn and bull-headed" but I prefer to consider myself "determined and persistent") I cut the corner off a 2 x 4 so I had a triangle approx 1-1/2" on a side. I glued these on the bottom, somewhat like mini edges, to make a mini version of a WYE tunnel. They were 4' long, flush with the edge of the bottom on the ends, so they are 3" from the edge in the center. I think they slowed down the "tippiness" from side to side. It still does it some, but I can still turn the boat by leaning in a glide, or by paddling harder on one side. I believe the difference in glide, or handling is hardly a factor. It makes me more comfortable, and I think I like it. Thanks for the ideas!!

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Oldsparkey
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Re: Laker "tippiness"

Post by Oldsparkey » Sun Aug 05, 2012 5:41 pm

One way to turn the boat is by leaning to one side or the other , it really helps when trying to turn by only using the paddle.
I have found that normally with a kayak it is leaning to the left to make a right turn and lean to the right to make a left turn. For some reason it is just the reverse for a canoe. Not sure if that is the same for others but it works for me. :D

As far as the tippiness it is like riding a bicycle , the more you paddle the boat the better it will respond to you and after a while the tippiness can be used to your favor. It will still be three but it will feel more solid to you when on the water.
Remember:
Amateurs built the Ark...... Professionals built the Titanic
Visit some fine paddlers at The Southern Paddler

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Mick
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Re: Laker "tippiness"

Post by Mick » Tue Aug 07, 2012 1:15 am

Mutter. mutter, fart, snort.

Laker is NOT tippy! It is a fine, flat water, recreational kayak that responds very well to subtle shifts in the paddler's position. Once one gets used to this responsiveness, the paddler wears the kayak like a glove and the boat is a joy to paddle.

The analogy to a bicycle is a good one. A bicycle is very unstable and "tippy' till one learns how to ride it.

This is my fiancee' Evie. She can't swim a stroke and had never paddled anything solo.

Image

This is her very first time paddling kayak and she is in a laker 13

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After a couple of hours in it, she was confident enough in it to take her camera out of her dry pack and start shooting.

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After her first day of paddling a Laker 13, I couldn't get her out of it :D

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Not even for my amazing camp cooking.

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Bang for buck, I reckon Laker is one of the best recreational kayak plans available

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