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 Post subject: First timer, canoe
PostPosted: Sun May 18, 2014 11:54 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 17, 2014 12:52 am
Posts: 2
Hi all
Like many...i've been visiting the site for years now and have been going through many projects by other builders.
Have been wanting to build a boat myself but absolute lack of experience with fiberglass kept that dream afar.
I consider myself an avid DIYer and my latest project can be seen here
http://tinyurl.com/nwb33lv

I do have a few tools but reading the forum made me realize i still need more.
Like carbide scrapers, a long T square ruler etc.
Some of these are hard to come by where i live, Sri Lanka
I recently got a pneumatic dual action air sander that brings me that much closer to starting the build. Or at least buying the plans :)

I want to build a canoe
I love the Sasquatch but was wondering if it's biting too much the first build :(

I'd be paddling mostly solo but occasionally with my 5yo son and probably the missus too.
It will be day paddles with a bit of fishing, dropping a crab pot maybe too
There's a river close to home and also a canal that joins the sea so it's fully protected waters.
I was thinking of the 15ft range as that's easier to truck top solo.

In order of preference... I like Sasquatch(15), Trapper(15-35) and the Merrimac.
I love the wood look and the traditional style.

Merrimac seems to be the easiest to build but i was wondering if it has heavy tradeoffs.
I think i can manage the wood work, it's the fiberwork that keeps me worried.
Especially after reading even the big boys here facing difficulties with it :(

Appreciate any thoughts before i pull the trigger on plans :)


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 Post subject: Re: First timer, canoe
PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 6:51 am 
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Joined: Mon Nov 12, 2007 8:12 am
Posts: 192
Location: S.E. Queensland
Hi Ranil. Welcome to the sickness that is boatbuilding. You do not need lots of tools. A piece of a broken file will work just as well as a tungsten carbide scraper. In fact if you don't put too much epoxy on to begin with you won't need a scraper at all. A tape measure, (never use two tape measures, they probably won't agree.) A straight edge. The numbers 3,4 and 5 gives you as big a square as you would ever need. A wood rasp, Stanley knife (boxcutter) a drill and a saw. Fibreglass work can be a learning curve. Practise on bits of scrap. It can't be that hard, I did it. :mrgreen:
Good luck and cheers John.


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 Post subject: Re: First timer, canoe
PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2014 8:16 am 
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Joined: Sat Jun 19, 2004 11:08 am
Posts: 1271
Location: Somewhere around Central Florida
I have the Sasquatch and love it. The Sasquatch is a 10 panel boat which means more stitching and fitting the panels together. Same with the Trapper.
The Merrimack is a 5 panel boat which would be a easier boat for someone starting out building wood boats. Taking that into consideration I started with my 1st boat a 17 1/2 kayak with 12 panels so I am not someone to listen to. :lol: :roll:

If you would decide to build the Merrimack then after paddling it and getting the boat building bug you could turn around and build a Sasquatch. Most folks build one boat and use it then they go on and build more of them , usually others they have been looking at.

Basically building a wood boat is nothing more then putting the pieces together and covering it with fiberglass. The greatest decision maker for me when deciding to build a boat is .......... Do I like the looks of it and want one , not very scientific but it works for me.

Glassing a boat is a simple process , lay the glass out , wet it in and let it cure. As with any step in building a wood boat it helps if you know the steps ( Process ) you will be doing and the way to do that is to read the instructions , reread them and read them again so you know what you will be doing and a couple of steps ahead. Plus do not get in a hurry.

Good Luck on making your decision. :D

Chuck.

_________________
Remember:
Amateurs built the Ark...... Professionals built the Titanic
Visit some fine paddlers at The Southern Paddler


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 Post subject: Re: First timer, canoe
PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2014 1:28 am 
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Joined: Sat May 17, 2014 12:52 am
Posts: 2
Thanks John,
Looks like the only tool i really need to get is the t square to be able to make accurate lines.
Right now i just got the 6 inch welders square. and long steel ruler.
Thanks for the encouragement on fiber work.
I guess one just needs to get going on things to be able to master it
It was the same feeling i had when i got started on arc welding. But now i'm pretty comfy with it :)

OldSparkey
You sir seems to share quite similar views as i do on making things :)
I too have had a similar approach to my projects and have had my fair share of failures, frustrations but eventual victory over things.
So it's gonna be the sasquatch for me and with gentlemen like you on the forum i'm sure i can pull this off.
Since you're a seasoned paddler and a proud owner of a sasquatch...what are your views on the 15footer?
It will be most solo, with a bit of photography, fishing and day tripping.
But should be able to take the missus and my 5yo son once in a while for short runs.

thank you so much for the support
much appreciated.


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 Post subject: Re: First timer, canoe
PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2014 8:25 am 
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Joined: Sat Jun 19, 2004 11:08 am
Posts: 1271
Location: Somewhere around Central Florida
I have the 14 which I set up as a solo boat just for my use.
The 15 or the 16 would be a good one to set up as a tandem so you could take the wife or your son with you. Heck with some practice you might even manage to take both at times for a short paddle on the water. Just make sure both have life vests on , better safe then sorry.

Just an after thought...............If you are thinking tandem then the 16 would be more versatile the extra foot does make a difference.
Mick made one for him and his wife and they have a ball with it on there trips , judging from there trip reports.
Here is one report and if you look threw it you can see Mick paddling it as a solo even if it was made as a tandem. viewtopic.php?f=19&t=3911

With the 15 as a tandem boat you probably would find it easier paddling it backwards when doing it as a solo paddle , that is by paddling from the bow seat and using it as the stern seat since it is set back more from the end of the canoe.
Or paddle from the stern seat like a normal canoe and have a weight in the bow to help hold it down , a full 5 gallon water can does a good job of holding the bow down. You can do the same thing when using the bow seat as the stern seat if it is needed. The only way to find out is to get on the water. :roll:

Chuck............

_________________
Remember:
Amateurs built the Ark...... Professionals built the Titanic
Visit some fine paddlers at The Southern Paddler


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 Post subject: Re: First timer, canoe
PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2014 5:29 pm 
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Joined: Thu May 26, 2005 8:40 pm
Posts: 23
Ranil wrote:
Thanks John,
Looks like the only tool i really need to get is the t square to be able to make accurate lines.


Don't fret over the 4' drywall square. They are about as square as a .32 automatic is accurate which isn't very.
I have 3 or 4. I have one intact which I do not use to square. The others I have taken apart and just use for a straight edge.
I certainly would not go to great lengths to find one.

They are priced cheap and made for rough work like hanging drywall. Not squaring fit and trim work.

Anything reasonably straight will work.

When I lay the plywood out for the offset numbers every foot. I make my foot marks on both long sides and connect them with the straight edge.
Just make sure you measure both both sets from the same edge of the piece of plywood.
That is the only use for that 4' square that isn't square and wouldn't remain square if it were square.

On the subject of squares, the typical L shaped framing square most us would buy are stamped steel. They aren't calibrated tools. I don't find many that are square but it's easy to determine if they are . Lay the square across a sheet of lumber and mark a line. Roll the square over and mark the same line. If the second mark deviates from the first mark it is not a square square. It's easily fixed with a metal punch though. Depending on the direction it's out of square you'll punch a divit on the inside or outside of the corner (face punch) of the square. That will either draw it in or push it out.


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