Strip built Okwata

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craiggamesh
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Strip built Okwata

Post by craiggamesh » Thu Jul 15, 2010 12:53 am

Well, I started this project awhile back (sometime in April), I just haven't had time to post pictures. I started by cutting templates out of cheap oriented strand board (OSB) like I did on the Sabalo build. I used luan for templates for the strip built touring pirogue I built a couple of years ago, but, I found the 1/4 plywood was more difficult to run the flush-cut router bit on and OSB is cheaper :) .

One set of every panel (except the bottom panels) was cut from the OSB. However, I chose to use marine ply for the bottom two panels due to: the extreme twist on the ends; the okume is a harder wood; and it will be covered with graphite/epoxy, so strips wouldn't be seen anyways.

Marine ply bottoms:
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glue joint in the marineply:
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For the rest of the panels, I ripped a bunch of cedar strips out of 5/4 X 4 deck boards that I found at Lowes. I hit the motherload of clear 10 footers :twisted: . The strips were slightly under 1/4 inch thick. I did not cove and bead the strips. When I ripped them, I kept them in the order they were cut from the board and taped them up so all strips from each board were kept together. I did this so I could book match the strips and the entire boat will be visually "balanced". This boat will be all cedar with no pine accent strips.

Here is a picture of the rear deck stripped next to the OSB template:
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The larger templates were laid out and I fastened them to my newly fabricated 16 foot table as per the QA measurements. I wanted to not have butt joints. Therefore, I could eliminate that step and also a potential weak spot. This is the same procedure I used on the JEM Touring Pirogue.

I started stripping on the top of the side panels so the seam will be all one continuous line. As I added strips, I laid an oak board on edge across every so many feet and clamped it down so when the strips were clamped to each others edges, the panel would not buckle. I was able to clamp about 3-4 rows at a time, so the panels went together rather quickly. You can see, on the right side of the table, the fiberglass curing on the bottom panel butt joints.
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The only nails used to hold the strips in place were on the upper edge. These holes will also be used for the stitching. I wanted to build with as few holes as possible. After the panels were glued and done, I trimmed them with the flush-cut router bit. Then, since none were wider than 13 inches, I ran the panels through my planer, It was a two person job on some since they were up to 15 feet long. I wish I would have done this on the piroge. It saves a lot of sanding, and makes a uniform thickness throughout the entire length of the panel. The final panel thickness was 3/16".

Then I fiberglassed the inside of the panels to strengthen them for the assembly and making it so I only have to tape the inside joints. I find it much easier then fiberglassing the entire inside.

Here is a shot of the two side panels after the flush cut bit, planing, and saturation coat of epoxy. I had started laying on the odds and ends of fiberglass:
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When I do the insides of these panels, I do not cut one long piece of glass. I like to use up the scraps and overlap them by about 2-4 inches. And when I don't have any scraps left I just cut the cloth width-wise off the roll into 54" pieces. I find it easier to handle that way than one long piece of glass cloth. The overall boat may end up a few ounces heavier, but I figure its cheaper due to less waste in the cloth since I get to use up my scraps. Since only one coat of epoxy has been put on the insides of these panels, you can see the overlaps:
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I almost left out the most critical step that I do on every boat. This time I got it out of the way right off the bat. I slipped with the Japanese pull saw while cutting a strip :shock: :

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I feel this step is necessary because the blood soaks into the porous wood leaving behind my DNA. Then, if the boat is ever stolen, I can prove its mine upon recovery :lol:

All the panels but the two long skinny deck panels are done and ready for assembly. I hope to get the hull tacked up this weekend. Then, maybe I can get the hull glassed on Monday night.
Regards,

Craig
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If I had more clamps, I could build more boats.
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olsnappa
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Re: Strip built Okwata

Post by olsnappa » Thu Jul 15, 2010 5:36 am

:shock: EEEEEeeeeuuw!! Aarrrghh!! Ouch! :shock:
craiggamesh wrote:I feel this step is necessary because the blood soaks into the porous wood leaving behind my DNA. Then, if the boat is ever stolen, I can prove its mine upon recovery :lol:
Nice idea....but I think I'd just rub some spit into the wood!! :D
John.
1 Cape Fear Sit In....a couple more planned
2 Laker 14's
1 Paddle board

"People who don't make mistakes don't make anything"

john the pom
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Re: Strip built Okwata

Post by john the pom » Thu Jul 15, 2010 10:47 am

I too can point out patches of my blood soaked into both boat and paddle :oops: Good idea on using it to identify property.
Cheers John

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Oldsparkey
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Re: Strip built Okwata

Post by Oldsparkey » Thu Jul 15, 2010 12:33 pm

Yep... All of the ones I have made have a few dark red spots somewhere on them , some more then others. :wink:

Chuck.
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Amateurs built the Ark...... Professionals built the Titanic
Visit some fine paddlers at The Southern Paddler

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craiggamesh
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Re: Strip built Okwata

Post by craiggamesh » Thu Jul 15, 2010 11:02 pm

olsnappa wrote::shock: EEEEEeeeeuuw!! Aarrrghh!! Ouch! :shock:
craiggamesh wrote:I feel this step is necessary because the blood soaks into the porous wood leaving behind my DNA. Then, if the boat is ever stolen, I can prove its mine upon recovery :lol:
Nice idea....but I think I'd just rub some spit into the wood!! :D

I was always told chicks dig scars! :lol: I guess spit would be less painful.

I have not drawn blood during a boat build with a power tool. It is always that darn Japanese pull saw. In this case, it was the one with two cutting edges and it was the edge that I wasn't using on top that got me. :?
Regards,

Craig
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If I had more clamps, I could build more boats.
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craiggamesh
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Re: Strip built Okwata

Post by craiggamesh » Sun Jul 18, 2010 10:07 pm

Got a little more work done yesterday. The bottom was stitched together and to the forms. The sides were stitched to the forms.
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I also started in on the long skinny 3A/3B panel stripping. I fastened the templates down and did the the QA checks. Then, I stripped it leaving extra around the entire perimeter since I figured that it would straighten out somewhat. I was right, it straightened, and I did not leave enough extra :roll: . I anticipated this, but I didn't want to add more to it because I wanted a uniform line where it meets the side panel. Time for the back-up plan.

Today, I removed the 3A/B panel from the templates and planed it to prep the inner side for fiberglass.

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Then I planed the deck pieces that I had previously stripped.

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After the planing, I drove a few nails back though their existing holes (used for the stripping) in the panels and into their respective holes in the templates. That way the panel was back in place just as it was during the stripping. Then I used up some 6 oz cloth pieces including some scraps and prepped for epoxy:

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Then I applied the epoxy. My hope is that when it cures, the fiberglass will help it hold its shape so I can flush cut it to the templates with the router. I figure that what little it straightens, will be corrected when it is stitched to the other panels. If not, then I will add more wood as needed.
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Regards,

Craig
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If I had more clamps, I could build more boats.
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craiggamesh
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Re: Strip built Okwata

Post by craiggamesh » Sun Jul 18, 2010 10:13 pm

Some shots of the "book matching" effect I was trying to do on the deck. The camera really distorted the shapes of the cockpit hole and the pirogue below.
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You can also see a couple other JEMs in the top photo. I laid the panels out on the Touring Pirogue since space was at a premium in the garage today. The Sabalo is sitting next to it on the trailer waiting for the next fishing trip.
Regards,

Craig
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If I had more clamps, I could build more boats.
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craiggamesh
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Re: Strip built Okwata

Post by craiggamesh » Sun Jul 25, 2010 3:56 pm

Well, yesterday I finally finished stripping the last of the panels. It was the other 3A/B skinny deck panel on the left. Then, I fiberglassed the inside of it and the other deck panels.

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Hopefully, I can break down the big work table and gain some room in the garage today. I need the boat building saw horses from the work table on the back deck so I can finally finish the 18 1/2 foot strip built canoe.
Regards,

Craig
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If I had more clamps, I could build more boats.
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LEE SCHNEIDERMANN
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Re: Strip built Okwata

Post by LEE SCHNEIDERMANN » Thu Jul 29, 2010 6:30 pm

One man's winter is another man's summer!
Great looking build!! Thanks for posting this one!
There are three kinds of people in this world.
Those who can do math, and those who can't.

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craiggamesh
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Re: Strip built Okwata

Post by craiggamesh » Fri Jul 30, 2010 12:57 am

Thanks Lee.

I haven't got much done this week. My central air unit condensation pan wasn't draining right and was overflowing into the garage. I was trying to figure out why and figured it was plugged. So, today I hooked the shop vac up outside on the end of the drain tube. After a few minutes of pulling a vacuum on the tube, I found the problem. Apparently, a skinny little mouse crawled up the tube, got stuck and drowned. Luckily, decomposition had set in and softened him up and he eventually shot out at a high velocity. Problem solved! Back to boat building.
Regards,

Craig
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If I had more clamps, I could build more boats.
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