Swamp Girl Progess

Builder show and discuss their progress.
Mullet_Key
Posts: 97
Joined: Wed Sep 08, 2004 11:38 am
Type of boat I like: <-- Please read instructions to the left and delete this text. Then, tell us what type boat you like! :-)
Location: Houston, TX
Contact:

Swamp Girl Progess

Post by Mullet_Key » Wed Jan 05, 2005 12:01 pm

How much can one guy accomplish 6-7 hours a week? Especially if that guy is kind of SPAM retentive and slightly dyslexic. The okoume has been purchased, the workstation is in place, the offsets have been expanded, the panels are drawn out, the plans read for the umpteenth time. Most of the supplies are in place or en route.

With luck and a steady hand, the bulk panel cutting starts this weeked. I'm not impressed with my new black and decker jig saw for cutting nice smooth kerfs on the curve. My recently purchased Japanese hand saw cuts very nicely, but will it cut three panels of 6mm ply? I'll let you know. MK
Pygmy Arctic Tern
JEM Swamp Girl -15
JEM Wadefish 15

banoe
Posts: 53
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2004 9:40 pm

Post by banoe » Wed Jan 05, 2005 10:06 pm

Mullet Key,

Chuck the jig saw and the bazookie saw and pick up a circular saw I find I can cut thin ply on long curves better and smoother with a circular saw.

Mullet_Key
Posts: 97
Joined: Wed Sep 08, 2004 11:38 am
Type of boat I like: <-- Please read instructions to the left and delete this text. Then, tell us what type boat you like! :-)
Location: Houston, TX
Contact:

Makita Circular Saw

Post by Mullet_Key » Thu Jan 06, 2005 1:13 pm

I just found and bought the Makita Circular Saw I had been searching for on ebay just in time to start cutting.
Pygmy Arctic Tern
JEM Swamp Girl -15
JEM Wadefish 15

jheger
Posts: 52
Joined: Thu Nov 18, 2004 12:05 pm
Type of boat I like: <-- Please read instructions to the left and delete this text. Then, tell us what type boat you like! :-)
Location: Weimar, TX

circular saw

Post by jheger » Sat Jan 08, 2005 9:41 am

Mullet_Key:

What model Makita circular saw did you buy? Also, I have two coats of epoxy on my hull. Do you normally sand between coats or just keep adding epoxy till you completely fill in the weave? Thanks

User avatar
jem
Site Admin
Posts: 4875
Joined: Fri Jun 18, 2004 8:14 pm
Type of boat I like: Wooden
Location: Greensboro, NC
Contact:

Post by jem » Sat Jan 08, 2005 10:11 am

For weave filling, you could go with a fairing compound like micro balloons if you're painting the hull.

I did the trick where I got some dark color primer and did a flake spray on the hull. Just so I had about 30 dots per inch all over the hull.

Than I sanded. Where there were still dots...those were low spots that needed more attention.


Bright work (natural wood finish) ... that's just an exercise in patience.
-Matt. Designer.

User avatar
Kayak Jack
Design Reviewer
Posts: 1186
Joined: Sun Jun 20, 2004 8:03 pm
Type of boat I like: <-- Please read instructions to the left and delete this text. Then, tell us what type boat you like! :-)
Location: South-central Michigan

Natural Wood Grain Finish

Post by Kayak Jack » Sat Jan 08, 2005 2:20 pm

Finishing wood bright is what kind, sensitive, intelligent fellas do. Only folks who paint wood are uncouth cads who spit in the parlor and pee in public. Gentlemen drink single malt Scotch, Earl Grey tea, and enhance the natural wood grain on boats. We also open doors for ladies, eschew gritz, vote Republican, and are TRUE outdoorsmen.

OK, nuff BS. Finishing bright is about four times easier than painting. Drips, runs, and sags are still present, but can be scraped off later with a cabinet scraper. Chuck's idea of a "saturation coat" on the wood the night before is a good idea. Then, lay on the glass, and fill in the weave. The lesson I'm slow on learning is to use the plastic squeegee to scrape back off about 90% of the top coat that is on the glass. This prevents those runs, sags, and drips that decorate my work. Since some areas "fill" and become smooth before others, the last coat of epoxy is often a situation of painting it onto the rough areas only to get them smooth.

Then, of course, you sand most of it off and apply one more thin coat.

Having learned boat building at the knees of John Lockwood of Pygmy, I use only the best Okoume 1/8" mahogany plywood, and glass inside and out. Better craftsmen than me can get away with using lesser materials; I can't.

Klutz in Training
Bodine Skool of Boat Makin
Kayak Jack
Doing what you like is FREEDOM
Liking what you do is HAPPINESS
I spent most of my money on whiskey and women - and I'm afraid I just wasted the rest.

Mullet_Key
Posts: 97
Joined: Wed Sep 08, 2004 11:38 am
Type of boat I like: <-- Please read instructions to the left and delete this text. Then, tell us what type boat you like! :-)
Location: Houston, TX
Contact:

Saws and fill coats

Post by Mullet_Key » Mon Jan 10, 2005 10:44 am

Makita Model 4200NH - James, I have not recieved it yet, so I can't comment on it's performance. I did cut out my bottom panels Saturday with my thin kerf Japanese hand saw. I cut short 1" sections and came back with with electric jig saw to make sure my cuts stayed vertical. (yes, O' wise ones, that did take a long time, but is was a Saturday and the I wanted to see some progress.) Note: I noticed all my cuts with any hand saw anywhere anytime tend to wander off the 90 deg vertical.

Epoxy fill coats. Basic rule I've researched and followed... if within 24 hours just recoat as needed, scraping off excess. If you wait longer, sand to etch the finish. Beware of "blush". Mild, very mild detergent wipe followed by clean fresh water and sufficiently dried removes it. In some cases 3 coats is sufficient. But sanding the 3rd, checking for weave breakthrough and applying a very thin light 4th coat is a primo finish.
Pygmy Arctic Tern
JEM Swamp Girl -15
JEM Wadefish 15

User avatar
jem
Site Admin
Posts: 4875
Joined: Fri Jun 18, 2004 8:14 pm
Type of boat I like: Wooden
Location: Greensboro, NC
Contact:

Re: Saws and fill coats

Post by jem » Mon Jan 10, 2005 11:07 am

Mullet_Key wrote: Beware of "blush". Mild, very mild detergent wipe followed by clean fresh water and sufficiently dried removes it.
Good info. I'll one bit of info I'll add: A simple wipe down won't do. Scotchbrite pad or stiff-bristled scrub brush and a little elbow grease.
-Matt. Designer.

Mullet_Key
Posts: 97
Joined: Wed Sep 08, 2004 11:38 am
Type of boat I like: <-- Please read instructions to the left and delete this text. Then, tell us what type boat you like! :-)
Location: Houston, TX
Contact:

Swamp Girl Progess in Houston

Post by Mullet_Key » Mon Jan 17, 2005 9:57 am

Got all the panels cut out. Couldn't start butt-glueing due to some volunteer projects, but will this week. Man, I'm glad I got the good respirator. The garage has heavy film of finedust generated by the Makita circular saw. (Note to self: D*%$ the neighbors, cut the panels out on the driveway for the next boat... NEXT BOAT???).
Pygmy Arctic Tern
JEM Swamp Girl -15
JEM Wadefish 15

Mullet_Key
Posts: 97
Joined: Wed Sep 08, 2004 11:38 am
Type of boat I like: <-- Please read instructions to the left and delete this text. Then, tell us what type boat you like! :-)
Location: Houston, TX
Contact:

80% of stitching done!

Post by Mullet_Key » Mon Jan 31, 2005 9:20 am

Got the panels stitched to the frames, all the panels are loosely stitched, except the ends. Step 7: "The 6mm floor panels have a twist in them so you'll have to force it a bit." Well Yeah!! It was me and the Swamp Girl... Mano a Bateau... with steel wire, needle nose pliers and the garaged door closed... I got her down. Actually I got one end stitched up. The wounds will have to heal before I tackle the other end. Photo's are still in the film camera. I'm so low tech. MK
Pygmy Arctic Tern
JEM Swamp Girl -15
JEM Wadefish 15

Post Reply