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PostPosted: Fri Oct 20, 2006 9:36 am 
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Location: Lutz-Steinhatchee, FL
Very, very nice. Anyone would be proud of that beautiful rig. One question though, you said you were going to graphite the bottom, isn't that stuff black and won't it coat the bottom like black paint?


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2006 11:11 am 
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Location: Orlando, Florida
surfman, you are correct. The graphite IS black and DOES coat the bottom of the canoe. I only put graphite on the two bottom panels. As you can see, it doesn't affect the look of the boat - we chose not to go up the sides at all because of that. I just realized I have NO pics that show the canoe bottom after graphite. Here's one on my car, where you can sorta see the bottom:
Image

You have to look hard, but there's a glossy black edge - that's the bottom. If I remember I'll get a better pic of the bottom tonight.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 25, 2006 1:53 pm 
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surfman

You are 100% correct, it looks like you painted it with black paint or tar. If you leave it as it was when it cured, if you sand it (a lot of work and darn messy, best when done by hand) then it is a dark gray because you removed the outer skin of the epoxy it exposes more of the graphite powder in the epoxy and make's it really slippery. Graphite is a lubricant. :D

With one of my boats I was slipping over trees, branches, weeds and all sorts of things while the guys in boats without the graphite were getting hung up on(Stuck). The graphite also helps to protect the bottom because things slide off it and don't take the bottom of the boat with them. It is like a coat of armor on the boat, you will get a scratch where an untreated boat will lose some of the fiberglass..

I read where racing boats do there hulls (water line and down) with the graphite powder to reduce the friction (more speed) with the water so why can't someone paddling a boat do the same. :idea: :idea: :idea:
It is one of my nutty ideas I came up with a few years ago to help me paddle thru the jungles in the water. I do paddle in places where no normal thinking person would want to go. :oops: What would you expect from a swamp paddler?
One person I know told me "It makes the boat have 4 wheel drive, it goes anywhere"

I copied this from my article on southernpaddler..........
http://www.neilbank.com/phpBB2/viewtopi ... c587ec792f

It was 50 this morning and then started warming up, the weather was just to nice to not be out in the shop and working on a boat. It is sanded down on the hull so why not start the epoxy and graphite.

Image

I am adding it to the bottom and the two side panels on this one because that is the area where the weeds and items will be striking the boat ( Look at the boat in the below picture ) at the water line .... I do paddle in some bad places and the graphite protects the boat besides letting it slip thru the obstructions.
I located a couple of good scratches on the bottom, just from taking the pictures (I wish folks would not throw junk in the water) another good reason to go ahead and protect the bottom.

Image

Chuck.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2006 7:22 am 
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Location: Lutz-Steinhatchee, FL
Thanks for the responces guys, I plan on putting the graphit on mine when I get to that step. I paddle in some tough areas too. I hope it also holds up well against oysters.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2006 8:06 am 
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It would help against oysters but the only thing (I know of) that holds up against oysters is called (from the weakest to the strongest ) Aluminum, Iron or Steel.

The best thing to use when you are in a mess of oysters is some Louisana hot sauce. :lol:

Chuck.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2006 5:08 pm 
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Location: Lutz-Steinhatchee, FL
Well I am also planning on using some of that s-glass and I am also thinking of adding a second layer of ply to the bottom just to add protection from penetration. I know the hull will get scratches and gouges in it, as long as they don’t come through. I am thinking of doubling the floor in the boat to add strength too as I plan to be standing up in the boat a lot and I think that will help against oil canning too.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 26, 2006 5:45 pm 
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One other thing you might want to do and that is to epoxy saturate the wood really good.... One way to do that is when you put the 1st saturation coat on there water it down (thin it) with some acetone ... this lets it really get into the wood. The degree you would want to thin it out is your choice but the thinner it is then more of it will get deeper into the wood.

The more epoxy that is in the wood the less chance of damage if you do get a deep gouge or scratch in it. Plus the epoxy will triple the strength of the wood , you might not need that extra 1/4 inch sheet on the bottom by doing it that way. :D

Matt might have some suggestions on the correct way (mix) to do that ... I just play it by ear when I do it.

Chuck.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2006 7:32 am 
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Location: Lutz-Steinhatchee, FL
Thanks Oldsparky I was thinking the same thing but I wasn't sure if I could or how to thin epoxy. If I thin it and apply it from both sides it seems that it would penetrate almost completely. And as you say increase strength further reducing gouges not to mention the possibility of rot. In the instructions Matt suggests using ribs to stiffen the bottom and prevent oil canning but I want a smooth bottom interior. I realize the extra layer would ad some weight. I also thought about adding the extra layer later if I felt it was necessary. I was going to add it to the inside floor. I was going to bring this up for discussion on my thread I didn't mean to wreck this thread.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2006 9:17 am 
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Surfman, consider this and chew it over in your mind. Saturate the wood as Chuck suggest, and for sure use at least three coats of graphite-enriched epoxy on the bottom.

But, staying with the original thickness for the boat bottom. On some trips, have one or more wooden templates that you simply lay down on the floor for that trip. these could be 1/8" or 1/4" plywood. An additional layer will spread the weight and help prevent buckling, but not be a permanent part of the boat for times when you neither want nor need them.

And, of course, you may find them unnecessary altogether.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 27, 2006 11:56 am 
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Location: Lutz-Steinhatchee, FL
Well I am planning on making my project into an electric boat. In other words I will not be paddling all the time plus there will be a battery or maybe two. The boat will end up fairly heavy when done but, I do want to keep it as light as possible. I may do as you suggest and go with one layer at first. I can always add a second layer later if I feel it is needed. The batteries may dictate a second layer too. I will find out as I go along. That is the beauty of a home made boat, right?


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